In Memory

Craig Coleman

https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/kamloops-bc/craig-coleman-9197003



 
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07/01/20 12:40 PM #1    

Jane Edmonds

Craig Bevan Coleman passed away suddenly and peacefully in Kamloops on May 20, 2020
at the age of 59.

Lovingly remembered by his wife Diane Coleman, and he was a good father to his children Glenn and Taryn for which he was tremendously proud for their accomplishments. Missed by his brother Bruce Coleman, whom he shared a strong bond with and his loving bossy sister Jane Disher who helped him along the way and he will forever be grateful for her nagging and constant support. Craig took in Les Disher and Gloria Ewen, the spouses of Jane and Bruce, like family not afraid to give them a hard time much the same as his did his brother and sister. A favourite uncle to Graham, Courtenay and Keisha Disher as he turned a blind eye to their mischievous stories and shared a chuckle. He was predeceased by his father Reginald Coleman and mother Margaret Coleman (Jenkins).

Craig started working at Canadian National Railway (CN) at the age of 18 on May 23, 1979. Beginning as a trackman and progressing to welder, and later foremen welder eventually becoming the youngest supervisor at CN. Through his commitment to his family he demoted himself back to foremen welder, taking time to spend with his newly born daughter and 3-year-old son. He enjoyed his time at CN and had many stories to share, he strongly believed that if everyone who worked on the railway share two of their favourite stories you would have a great book on your hands, one that he would read over and over. His career with CN latest just short of 38 years with him retiring in September 2018.

His great sense of humour and ability to tell stories made him the life of the party. He was always known for his infectious laugh which could be heard for miles. Throughout his younger years he spent his time with a bunch of troublemakers always pushing their luck. Craig was their silent leader, managing to be their voice of reason when their plans lacked thought. A special memory from one of his best childhood friends was at 13 years old, bored while they hung around Trimble Park, looking for stupid things to do. When a noisy neighbour called the police and the chase was on, which was a problem for Craig's friend who at the time was in a leg cast and not in a good place to be sprinting off with the rest of the gang. Craig stayed behind to make sure there was no man left behind, looking out for the weakest link in the herd. Craig egged him on pushing him to pick up pace and luckily, they chalked up another successful run-a-way. There were many more stories such as this one as Craig sought to help the strangers he met on the street, to acquaintances he met briefly, to his closest family and friends. He cared so deeply for those around him that often it seemed he forgot to return the favour for himself, always asking how you were and never going on to say how he was doing.

His family, friends and anyone who talked to him long enough would consider themselves fortunate to have heard his incredulous, hilarious and sit-on-the-edge-of-your-seat stories. Those who knew him well were fortunate to have enjoyed his company, friendship and laughter.

He will be forever missed in our hearts and he will live forever in our stories.
 
Craig Bevan Coleman passed away suddenly and peacefully in Kamloops on May 20, 2020
at the age of 59.

Lovingly remembered by his wife Diane Coleman, and he was a good father to his children Glenn and Taryn for which he was tremendously proud for their accomplishments. Missed by his brother Bruce Coleman, whom he shared a strong bond with and his loving bossy sister Jane Disher who helped him along the way and he will forever be grateful for her nagging and constant support. Craig took in Les Disher and Gloria Ewen, the spouses of Jane and Bruce, like family not afraid to give them a hard time much the same as his did his brother and sister. A favourite uncle to Graham, Courtenay and Keisha Disher as he turned a blind eye to their mischievous stories and shared a chuckle. He was predeceased by his father Reginald Coleman and mother Margaret Coleman (Jenkins).

Craig started working at Canadian National Railway (CN) at the age of 18 on May 23, 1979. Beginning as a trackman and progressing to welder, and later foremen welder eventually becoming the youngest supervisor at CN. Through his commitment to his family he demoted himself back to foremen welder, taking time to spend with his newly born daughter and 3-year-old son. He enjoyed his time at CN and had many stories to share, he strongly believed that if everyone who worked on the railway share two of their favourite stories you would have a great book on your hands, one that he would read over and over. His career with CN latest just short of 38 years with him retiring in September 2018.

His great sense of humour and ability to tell stories made him the life of the party. He was always known for his infectious laugh which could be heard for miles. Throughout his younger years he spent his time with a bunch of troublemakers always pushing their luck. Craig was their silent leader, managing to be their voice of reason when their plans lacked thought. A special memory from one of his best childhood friends was at 13 years old, bored while they hung around Trimble Park, looking for stupid things to do. When a noisy neighbour called the police and the chase was on, which was a problem for Craig's friend who at the time was in a leg cast and not in a good place to be sprinting off with the rest of the gang. Craig stayed behind to make sure there was no man left behind, looking out for the weakest link in the herd. Craig egged him on pushing him to pick up pace and luckily, they chalked up another successful run-a-way. There were many more stories such as this one as Craig sought to help the strangers he met on the street, to acquaintances he met briefly, to his closest family and friends. He cared so deeply for those around him that often it seemed he forgot to return the favour for himself, always asking how you were and never going on to say how he was doing.

His family, friends and anyone who talked to him long enough would consider themselves fortunate to have heard his incredulous, hilarious and sit-on-the-edge-of-your-seat stories. Those who knew him well were fortunate to have enjoyed his company, friendship and laughter.

He will be forever missed in our hearts and he will live forever in our stories.
 
 

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